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Does underfloor heating work with carpet?

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Does underfloor heating work with carpet?

More and more people are now wishing to improve their home with underfloor heating (UFH). And as carpet is just as popular as ever, it begs the question – can the two things be laid together?

It’s something we get asked all the time, here at the Carpet Underlay Shop. Carpet is soft, sumptuous and adds a layer of insulation – and, as a result, many people assume these features will prevent the transfer of heat. But rest assured, this isn’t the case. It is perfectly possible to install underfloor heating with carpet; there are just a few things you need to consider first.

3 factors to consider for successful under carpet heating

1. Carpet TOG

First things first, you need to check the TOG rating of your chosen carpet. This is a measure of the carpet’s insulating properties. The higher the TOG, the more effective the carpet will be at insulating the room – and the more it will prevent heat transfer from the system into the room.  

When installing underfloor heating under carpet, it is important to choose a carpet with a lower TOG rating. This starts by choosing a thinner carpet and ideally synthetic carpet, such as a polypropylene carpet. If you choose a wool carpet, these carpets absorb the heat a little more and stop some of the heat coming through. So ideally both the underlay and carpet should not exceed 3.0-3.3 TOG. Hessian-backed carpets are a particularly good option.

It’s also important to remember that if you exceed 3.3 TOG, don’t worry! It just means your carpets take a little longer to warm up. But we want to be efficient right? So, try to keep it under 3.3 TOG.

2. Underlay

You also need to think carefully about the carpet underlay. Underlay is typically made to be as thick and warm as possible – thus boosting its thermal insulation properties. But when it comes to UFH, these features can have a hugely detrimental effect on the heating’s overall effectiveness.

The best option is to invest in an underfloor heating underlay that is specifically designed for use with a heating system. In most cases, it is made to be very thin and benefits from a low TOG rating.

Here at Carpet Underlay Shop, we constantly analyse the market for the best products out there. We currently recommend the Thermal Stream Underlay for use with underfloor heating and carpet. This is a revolutionary product, which boasts:

  • perforated holes – which dramatically increase heat air circulation
  • a low TOG rating of 1.1
  • a 10mm thickness – thicker than most other underlays, so you get a softer feeling in your carpets
  • excellent acoustic properties

Thanks to this unique combination of features, it will successfully optimise the performance of your new system and is the perfect option for any domestic or commercial UFH project.

Example of underfloor heating underlay

3. Supplier expertise

A good underfloor heating company will ask about the thermal resistance of your selected carpet and underlay. Based on this information, they should then be able to establish a suitable number of heating tubes (and space them appropriately), to ensure your heating system works effectively. 

With this in mind, it’s important to do your research. Be sure to look online for reviews, ask for recommendations and select a supplier who will ensure your under carpet heating is a success.

Get in touch for further guidance

Not only is it possible to install underfloor heating under carpet, but the final effect is also soft, cosy and incredibly luxurious – making it the perfect option for a lounge, bedroom and more.

If you would like further advice regarding UFH or have a question about our underfloor heating underlay, you’re welcome to get in touch. Our team have excellent knowledge in this area and we’re always on hand and happy to help. Simply give us a call on 0203 887 0994 or send an email to sales@carpet-underlay-shop.co.uk and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

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  • Carl Smith